At What Point Do You Say, "Enough is ENOUGH!!"?

For me that was this morning. I had just finished cleaning house. My hair was pulled back, I was wearing shorts and a sports bra and I stopped to look at my reflection in the mirror. 

I broke out in tears.

Not only am I too broke to have my deflated breast implant fixed, I can't even afford to spend money on a chicken cutlet. It looks like I've had a unilateral mastectomy. I can only imagine what women who HAVE had that surgery must feel like.

Then there's the fact that I have been living with a tumor for nine years. It's grown well past the point I said I would let it get to before agreeing to have surgery.

So, feeling the weight of my troubles, I sat down and just let the crying come. I let 'er rip. When that was over, after I felt the feels I needed to, I got up, wiped my face and decided right then and there that I would no longer tolerate living this way.

I have known for a while now that exposing this less-than-fab side of my life would open up the conversation about courage and confidence that we need to have.

I was still holding on to the belief that, to get your respect and trust, I could only show you my pretty and successful side (and dammit, that's all I wanted you to see). I hoped you would see me as a badass and know that I could help you be a badass, too.

I've since realized coming all the way clean was the best possible thing I could do for myself and for those who follow me and seek my support and guidance. So here I am, revealing to you the less-than-perfect, the struggle, the stripped down side of myself. I see now that my job is to be boldly transparent, unabashedly truthful, and trust myself (and the Universe) - no matter what. 

I am supposed to show up courageously and confidently - not only when my hair and makeup are on point, but when I'm feeling flawed. Especially then!

I am supposed to tell my story. I've struggled. I've surrendered. I've succeeded. Over and over again.

Now is no different than when I decided to stop tolerating the other sucky situations in my life. Like when I worked as a call girl or when I was in a sexless relationship.

Apparently, phase one of my job was to learn how to overcome significant life challenges. Phase two is about sharing 'how I do it' with other people who are struggling.

Okay.

The thing I am really great at is getting to the absolute source of the struggle and uncovering the information that leads to healing - at a soul level - and transforms the situation in a way that makes people stronger and more confident.

I've had the privilege (yes, I mean that) of doing this twice before in my life. So now my level of confidence in the face of THIS challenge is off the mother fucking charts.

The flaws I saw in the mirror today I am genuinely grateful for. I can say, "FUCK YEAH!" about them - for real! They are what allow me to know what courage feels like. They have taught me what real confidence is. I am a badass because of these flaws and because of my struggles. (and so are YOU, my dear)

My best girlfriend, Allison, says my superpower is CONFIDENCE. I see clearly that all of my challenges, including the ones I face now, are why I can expose myself without fear or embarrassment.

I know I am here to help other women feel and be this way, too.

If you're at your end point and ready to have kick-ass confidence...LET'S TALK.

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colette davenport

Colette Davenport helps healers, empaths, and creatives get their magic back. By ending their secret addictions and self-sabotage, clients gain the clarity, confidence, and direction to take their lives to a whole other dimension. Colette is an international coach and speaker, a published author, and the founder of Badass Empath Academy, the school for gifted people.

“Over the course of 25 years, I've had the honor of helping people heal themselves of chronic illness, reestablish intimacy in sexless marriages, turn struggling businesses into profit-generating ones, and leave the 'safe' job (or relationship) they loathed for a life they LOVED. This is my calling.” — Colette Davenport